Making a Logo and Slogan That People Talk About

You’ve started a business and now have the difficult task of creating a logo and slogan that will go with it perfectly. This can be a time consuming task, but it can be a little easier if you know how to start.  We’ve got some ideas to help you.

  1. Versatility, appeal, and simplicity go a long way. Sometimes the most basic logos are the most recognizable to us. McDonald’s, for example, is known in almost every country in the world and, according to Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal, is more recognizable than the cross. And, it’s just a yellow ‘M’!

  2. Your slogan and logo should tell a story, but not your whole story. Instead put it into one sentence (that’s your slogan) and find an image that builds on that. Sounds tough, so give yourself the time to figure this one out.

 

The woman in the Starbucks logo is actually the character Pequod from Herman Melville’s Moby Dick. It opens up a whole new story for Starbucks, who has been a leading place for writers to sit and drink coffee for 8 hours a day. Perhaps the next Moby Dick will be written from one of their tables.

  1. Don’t think colour means nothing.  A quick Google search on “Colour Psychology” will produce multiple results on just how important choosing the perfect colour is and how individuals inherently associate different things based on slight adjustments to basic colours. It’s funny to think too, that the colour of those golden arches may have been chosen because the colour yellow has been proven in colour theory research to que hunger.
     

  2. Be unique, but don’t try so hard that you create something that doesn’t reflect you or your business. Remember, it doesn’t need to be perfect, just perfect for your business.
     

  3. Be curious. Play around with ideas and seek inspiration. Sometimes the best ideas are something you never thought to have for your business.

 

Have you looked at the logo for Amazon recently? If you notice the orange underline beneath the letters, you’ll see it’s actually a smile. Because, of course Amazon knows that being able to order your favourite treats online and have them delivered to your door a couple days later, is smile worthy.  But, did you notice that the smile is in direct correlation to the letters “A” to “Z”? A playful example of Amazon’s way to highlight they’ve got it all, from “a to z”.
 

  1. Ask your audience and the people around you what they think or even hold a vote if your business is already up and going.  You can get an idea of what will grab people’s attention and what won’t by letting a third party take a look. This is a great way to determine how the new logo is perceived, however public opinion is one thing, attracting your target audience is another. Be cautious that those you’re seeking an opinion from are aware of who you’re selling your product or service to.
     

  2. Make it consistent. Remember, this logo will (hopefully) be with you for a while, so choose  something that will go well with your overall brand goals long-term. However, some brands have changed their logo and still done remarkably well afterward, but they were usually already recognizable as a company and needed the refresh to stay relevant.

 

You probably recognize the Apple logo as just that, an apple. The brand started out as a picture of Isaac Newton sitting under the tree that changed his life. It didn’t last long though, the apple (possibly in reference to the one that fell on Newton’s head while he sat there) came into being soon after and has been there ever since.

“Simple can be harder than complex: You have to work hard to get your thinking clean to make it simple. But it’s worth it in the end because once you get there, you can move mountains.” - Steve Jobs

 

Now that you have a few tips to help you on your way,  we hope it can be a little easier for you on your logo creating journey. If you still think you could use a little help, Spark is here.


What businesses logos do you love? Tag them in the comments below.

Kimberley Falk - Multimedia Writer